Growing Marijuana with Rabbit Poop

When I first stumbled onto this gold mine recipe for the best marijuana plants you could ever grow it was honestly mind blowing. I was standing in the field looking at 7-10 marijuana plants, erm, bushes, erm, they where actually like trees. I stand 6’2″ or 190cm and they were at least a foot taller than me. The stalks were the size of my forearms. The nugget cone was abundant and beautiful. What was the secret?
 
The placement of this patch of marijuana plants happened to be on top of my old rabbit poop dump area. It was absolutely drenched in rabbit poop and pee. The entire ground area was at least five or six inches thick with nothing on top. This was left over one winter and I planted young clones inside the pen in early spring. With a little trimming along the way I literally didn’t have to do a thing.
 
Using rabbit poop is beneficial for many reasons. Unlike other fertilizers that can burn and kill your plants, rabbit poop won’t kill your plant. No matter what. You could literally have a cup of fresh rabbit poop, plant your seed or clone, and it will grow like crazy. I have tried many types of growing from hydro to clay to LED to HPS and MH to soil to outdoor and indoor.. ect. By far rabbit poop is the best method I have ever used indoor or outdoor.
 
The poop itself has very little smell, if at all. It’s not like other manure and actually holds to the strength and size of the clay grow medium used in hydro growing. Instead of having to worry about chemical percentages and the perfect recipe, simply throw in some rabbit poop and just water them. You won’t kill your plants and they will be absolutely beautiful.
 
You might ask yourself where on earth can you get a regular supply / regular supply 2 of rabbit poop. For me, that answer was simple. Raise them!
 
There are many ways to do this that can benefit you in more ways than one. You can raise them in cages and collect directly from them. As well as some babies to grow your colony or sell them to friends or on craiglist. You can actually make a decent profit selling bunnies on the side while collecting your own poop. You can raise them this way for meat as well. If you enjoy rabbit and don’t mind the butcher process (which is actually very humane, simple, and easy), you can actually get yourself a very good stream of good quality meat for very cheap. If you enjoy hunting and have your own property you can also raise them for free range.
 
Personally I did a mix of it all. I raised my rabbits for a month or two and then would release them. On my property I built a few brush piles for their houses. Simply piled up some brush, threw down a tarp, piled some more brush, and they really enjoyed it. I also planted my front field as a food plot. I planted clover, alfalfa, all the way to sunflower seeds, trees, and fruit bushes. All kinds of things and then simply let the field grow out. Starting with just three rabbits I had over 100 in less than a year. I could hunt them, use them for manure by placing scraps or cracked corn in a certain area, I could catch them in cages with food to sell or butcher. It was the best of all worlds. Free range rabbits are ideal for any property.
 
Almost any plant I used with rabbit manure grew like nothing I had seen before. In the garden, my marijuana plants, starting seeds. Everything. They work so well and teamed up with the other benefits of raising rabbits it was really a no brainer. It replaced many things in my arsenal and made the process so much simpler by just using rabbit poop. Plus it’s fun to raise baby bunnies.
 

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Raising Free Range Rabbits

Not often do you hear or see the words together “free range” and “rabbits”. It wouldn’t be feasible in a city environment or even a suburban area but free range rabbits have become one of my favorite critters on the farm despite the few drawbacks.
 
It all started with 3 meat rabbits. They where kept in rabbit runs with a small hutch in the corner. These proved to be efficient but I had to feed and water daily. Once spring hit I put them together to mate and I had two pregnant females. A few weeks later I adopted a few small kittens for mice control and this made the new mothers quite nervous. They stopped building a nest in the pen and began digging under the fence to escape. I didn’t notice until it was too late. All three rabbits had escaped.
 
They didn’t go far though; they built a nest close by and had their babies. They continued to do almost the exact same thing in the pen, as out. They would come get some food once in a while but hardly touched their water. I realized quickly how nice it was not having to feed or water them daily or clean their cages.
 
When I moved into my winter quarters the rabbits moved to that part of the property with me as well. They would steal chicken corn once in a while but mostly still dug in the snow and got their own food. Some move off and do their own thing but most of the new babies stick around. I made them a few habitats on the property compiled of simple brush and tree collections from the property into one huge brush pile. This seems to be their favorite type of home and by far the cheapest for me.
 
I realized they were far smarter than the cage animals most farmers made them out to be. They have built their own colonies on the property and joined the local eco system using wild birds for predator calls and warnings. I have also noticed the lawn itself is much healthier and any concentrate of rabbit poop generates an overgrowth in that area. I myself have a large dog that does not chase the rabbits so they feel a bit of comfort when he’s out in the field with them. They are capable of thwarting off most predators with their speed and agility but it’s easy enough to take care of anything that gets too curious.
 
There are however a few downsides to free range rabbits. Rabbits like to DIG. They will dig all over and everywhere. They will dig under your barns and sheds and if they can, move right in. They also create small holes but these seem to cave in with the rain and weather. The biggest problem is really the digging into unwanted places.
 
This however can be solved with a little extra work. There is a few ways of doing this but the most effective for me, and easiest, was to simply lay down some heavy duty wire fencing about a foot wide along the entire building. I simply covered it with gravel to match the foundation and since then they have not been able to dig in.
 
Cons aside, I almost forgot to mention the best part about free range rabbits. They work for you. Instead of having to provide food and water mixed with clean cages and fresh shavings, they are out doing this for you. They have babies, bulk up, hang around, all to provide you with the easiest source of meat you will ever have. Harvested with a pellet gun or .22 all that’s left is to clean and cook it!

Our Mission

Political correctness is nothing less than thought control!

(Every time you share this article a feminist shaves her head and a statist gets arrested)